Washington's Waiting Children




NWAE Number:C8120
 
Child Name:Gabriel
Age:16
D.O.B.:12/1997
Gender:Male
Race/Culture:White/Caucasian
 
Profile Written:06/2011
Profile Updated:08/2013





Narrative


Gabriel is having lots of fun developing his skills and interest in the Culinary Arts. After taking a summer class in cooking, he continues to want to develop and create new dishes, such as his Fettuccini Alfredo with tomatoes, which is fast becoming his signature dish. He is focused on learning new recipes and using his creativity to develop different flavors and sauces. Becoming a cook or support person in a restaurant a vocation in which he could excel; and at 6 feet, 4 inches tall, he certainly would stand head and shoulders above his fellow cooks. He In addition to culinary interests, Gabe enjoys listening to music, playing sports, swimming, going for walks, reading and drawing, and playing card games.

An active lifestyle suits Gabe very well but he needs very close supervision when with peers and in the community. At his therapeutic group home, Gabe has an adult mentor to participate with him one-on-one in recreational pursuits, such as shopping, going to movies, and taking part in special events. His mentor is also a valuable resource in helping him to increase his independent living skills education. Gabe benefits from having behavioral tools and strategies to help him cope with his feelings and frustrations. Gave is accustomed to living and going to school in highly structure environments, and he benefits from having clear rules and expectations, as well as rewards for good behavior. Fortunately, rewards and privileges are great motivators for Gabe.

In his school program where he is working pretty much at a six-seventh grade level, Gabe has made significant gains in increasing his math and verbal skills.

Being in a residential treatment program has helped to give Gabe stability. Legally free, Gabe came into foster care in 2006 and multiple placements since then have taken a toll on him, exacerbating feelings of loss and abandonment, as well as his attention difficulties, high energy, and impulsiveness.

Gabe meets with his therapist at his group home a few times a week for 15 minutes up to an hour to work on developing behavioral tools and strategies to moderate his mood swings and to manage his impulsiveness – two areas that continue to be challenging. While it is known that drug abuse was significant in his birth family, it is not known if Gabe was exposed in utero; the challenges of his mood swings and impulsiveness, though, are suggestive of fetal alcohol effects.

Gabe absolutely needs to have well structured home and school settings, with parents and teachers who will give him a high level of consistency and clear rules, expectations, limits, consequences for non-compliance that have been laid out clearly ahead of time, and supervision. Adoptive parent(s) who are innovative thinkers open and willing to try new approaches to guiding and parenting Gabe will meet his needs best. Gabe will be counting on his adoptive folks to help him continue to have contact with his grandparents through phone calls, letters, and summer visits.

Gabe's social worker wants to hear from couples and single parents who enjoy parenting and guiding teens. Being willing to participate with Gabe in counseling during his transition into his adoptive home would be a wonderful way for his adoptive parent(s) to show their love and commitment to him. It would also show that they value using such resources to help family members deal with past hurts and make behavioral changes. Gabe might benefit from having such resources as part of his regular support system for the foreseeable future. To help his adoptive parent(s) hang in there with Gabe over the long term, it would be very helpful for them to have a strong repertoire of behavioral tools and strategies to bring to parenting Gabe. It could also be valuable for his adoptive folks to have a behavioral therapist as part of their support system, as well as good respite care available from among family, friends, or the community.

These are "profiles" only and are not intended to provide the detailed information that a family worker and family require in order to make a placement decision.





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